Photo Credit: Tanya Dawn

 

Last week, my computer crashed taking a year’s worth of email and documents with it. The back up is corrupted too (if I owe you a response, please let me know).

Also last week, a friend who owns property in another state was awakened at 3 am by a phone call informing her that her place was on fire.

This week, another friend discovered that his wife has a boyfriend.

Each event felt emotionally troubling and caused quite a bit of logistical hassles too. I can only speak for myself, but it’s likely that we all shared a moment of “why me” thinking. We’re human and unless we choose our direction, the mind will go straight to such reactive thoughts and behaviors. 

What amazed me was that each of us, as soon as we became deliberate in our thinking, chose to accept the event instead of spending days, weeks or worse, lamenting, regretting, rehashing or complaining. We simply said yes to the event and took the best present actions we could.

Emotional pain and upset are not caused by an event itself; the same event can be interpreted a myriad of ways. For example, a man dies. One may see his death as a shame, another as a release from worldly troubles, another as a deserved consequence, another as a heartache, one may even see it as a fortuitous event. 

Emotional pain and upset are caused by our unwillingness to accept what has occurred. Through our resistance to what is, we bind ourselves to upset, sadness, frustration and anger.

Sometimes, when the meaning of what’s been lost or harmed is great, it may be too much to ask oneself to accept it immediately; the grieving process is vital. However, retaining the concept of acceptance as the ultimate goal is helpful.

For most events though, fast-tracking oneself to a state of non-resistance and acceptance of what has occurred can take the teeth out of a situation, place one on the path to making the best of what remains, and moving forward.

Wonderfully, once that happens, the gifts hidden within the event come forth. 

The next time something, little or not so little, goes wrong try moving into a place of acceptance.

It happened. I accept it. I’m moving forward from here.

This is your life. Let nothing rob of you of its goodness.

21 Day Fast


Could you spare 3 weeks--just 21 days--to refrain
from negative self-judgment and criticism?

Take the challenge:

Thank you!

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